Letter & Resume Tips

Resume Headline for Freshers & Experienced [Tips & Examples]5 min read

December 19, 2019 4 min read
how to write a resume headlines

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Resume Headline for Freshers & Experienced [Tips & Examples]5 min read

Read­ing Time: 4 min­utes

A resume head­line is more than just a cap­tion for your resume. It is the ide­al way to make your­self stand out from the com­pe­ti­tion and high­light your worth as a can­di­date. It is posi­tioned at the top of the resume right below the name and con­tact infor­ma­tion of the can­di­date.

As a result, it becomes the pri­ma­ry thing your recruiter reads right after your name. So draft­ing a pro­fes­sion­al resume head­line is the per­fect oppor­tu­ni­ty to make the recruiter see what makes you an ide­al can­di­date for the role they are hir­ing for. 

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Resume Headlines VS Resume Profile

Most peo­ple get con­fused between a resume head­line and a resume pro­file. A resume pro­file is com­pa­ra­ble to resume head­line in terms of pro­vid­ing a sum­ma­ry of a candidate’s expe­ri­ence and qual­i­fi­ca­tions but it is not the same thing.

Because a resume pro­file is longer than a resume head­line. A resume pro­file is the length of a para­graph or mul­ti­ple bul­let points where­as a resume head­line is one brief phrase that describes the can­di­date in the most pre­cise man­ner.

A resume head­line is more eye-catch­ing than a resume pro­file. The resume pro­file is a para­graph that talks about the can­di­date. While a resume head­line does the same thing but it is bold and cap­i­tal­ized which makes it eye-catch­ing. How­ev­er, both of them are used togeth­er in a resume.

Examples of Resume Headlines:

Here is a set of exam­ples of resume head­lines that can be use­ful when writ­ing your own:

  • IT Engi­neer: IT Pro­fes­sion­al with ten years of expe­ri­ence in soft­ware sup­port.
  • Sales: Sales Exec­u­tive with sev­en years of expe­ri­ence in Insur­ance and Health­care Man­age­ment.
  • Finance: Detail-ori­ent­ed con­troller imple­ment­ing impec­ca­ble finan­cial report­ing in the man­u­fac­tur­ing sec­tor.
  • Edi­tor: Award-win­ning edi­tor skilled in web design.
  • Nurs­ing: Bilin­gual nurs­ing grad­u­ate with expe­ri­ence in rur­al health care.
  • Accoun­tant: Goal-ori­ent­ed senior accoun­tant with five years of account­ing expe­ri­ence.
  • Med­i­cine: Cer­ti­fied Med­ical assis­tant with an influ­en­tial emer­gency care back­ground.
  • Admin: Admin­is­tra­tive assis­tant with 2+ years of expe­ri­ence in real estate.
  • Man­age­ment: Inge­nious Project Man­ag­er with 10+ years of expe­ri­ence in team han­dling.
  • Mar­ket­ing: Award-win­ning mar­ket­ing man­ag­er with sev­en years of expe­ri­ence.

Examples Of Resume Headlines For Freshers:

Expe­ri­enced can­di­dates get the oppor­tu­ni­ty to high­light their exper­tise and abil­i­ties with a catchy phrase. But fresh­ers don’t have that option. Their resume head­lines may lack expe­ri­ence but can include abun­dant tal­ent and achieve­ments. Here is a set of exam­ples of resume head­lines for fresh­ers:

    • Mechan­i­cal Engi­neer: Skilled in COSMOS with a grand pas­sion for machine and machine learn­ing.
    • SEO Ana­lyst: Cer­ti­fied SEO Ana­lyst with the knowl­edge to crack the code of the mar­ket.
    • Con­tent Writer: Knack to con­vert mun­dane into mag­ic and using the right key­words to express accu­rate emo­tions.
    • PHP Devel­op­er: Intern­ship expe­ri­ence in devel­op­ing high-end web­sites with the abil­i­ty to com­mu­ni­cate in PHP.
    • Full Stack Devel­op­er: In-depth knowl­edge of Java and Python with a pas­sion to learn and grow.
    • Aero­nau­ti­cal Engi­neer: Inquis­i­tive about the dynam­ics between machine and man with a deep under­stand­ing of aero­dy­nam­ics and ther­mo­dy­nam­ics.
    • Graph­ic Design­er: The abil­i­ty to rec­og­nize and dis­tin­guish the trend­ing mod­el and work in tight spaces and time frames. 
    • Android Devel­op­er: Per­sis­tent, team play­er, with knowl­edge of Android devel­op­ment plat­forms and frame­works. 
    • IT Engi­neer: Goal-ori­ent­ed and resolved with a sharp eye for details. Skilled in var­i­ous pro­gram­ming lan­guages includ­ing JAVA, Python, and SQL.
  • Tutor­ing: Hon­or roll stu­dent with tutor­ing expe­ri­ence in var­i­ous sub­jects.

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Tips For Writing Professional Resume Headlines

In order to write a pro­fes­sion­al and crisp resume head­line, tak­ing note of the fol­low­ing tips could be use­ful:

  • Keep it Brief

    As men­tioned ear­li­er, a resume head­line should be short and catchy. The goal is to artic­u­late your val­ue as a can­di­date in a pre­cise and con­cise man­ner. Any­thing longer will defeat the pur­pose of a ‘head­line’.

  • Position and Title

    Resume head­line should be placed at the top of your resume because it acts as a sum­ma­ry of every­thing the recruiter will go through in your resume. Also, the head­line should be in cap­i­tal let­ters only, to make it stand out.

  • No Cliches:

    Since the goal of a resume head­line is to make your resume stands out, avoid using clich­es that the recruiter is tired of read­ing on every oth­er resume. Avoid using terms like, ‘high­ly depend­able’, ‘hard-work­ing’, etc. Let your achieve­ments and expe­ri­ence speak for them­selves.

  • Certification

    If you have a cer­ti­fi­ca­tion that is rel­e­vant to the job you are apply­ing for or if it’s list­ed as a require­ment, put your cer­ti­fi­ca­tion in your resume head­line. So for exam­ple, the head­line could begin with “Cer­ti­fied con­tent writer…” fol­lowed by your expe­ri­ence, skills, etc.

  • Different Headline

    Writ­ing a dif­fer­ent head­line for each job that you apply to might seem time-con­sum­ing. But this tip is ben­e­fi­cial because once you go through the require­ments for the job, you will be able to write a head­line that match­es it. As a result, your resume head­line will prove you are per­fect for the job. 

  • Use Keywords

    Using key­words is a great way by which you can make your resume head­line catchy and wit­ty. You can use key­words to demon­strate your skills as well as fit the job require­ment to make your­self sound like a good fit.

  • Massive Achievements

    Anoth­er thing to add to your resume head­line is a mas­sive achieve­ment. Won an award? Pub­lished a book? Men­tion it as your resume head­line title. For exam­ple, “Dig­i­tal mar­ket­ing exec­u­tive who land­ed $20 mil­lion in sales”

  • Highlight Values

    A resume head­line show­cas­es your ‘sell­ing points’ to con­vince the recruiter that you are the can­di­date they want. So high­light­ing your key val­ues and tal­ents that are rel­e­vant to the job will be a bonus.

  • Getting Past ATS

    This tip goes along the way of using the right key­words and jar­gon for the job. Using the right key­words will ensure your appli­ca­tion gets beyond the appli­cant track­ing soft­ware. ATS blocks way too many appli­ca­tions before they even reach the recruiters. There­fore, it is essen­tial to use the right jar­gon.

  • Proofread

    Before sub­mit­ting a resume any­where, a can­di­date proof­reads it thor­ough­ly. While a resume head­line is writ­ten to stand out, some­times a per­son may skip it while proof­read­ing and give more atten­tion to oth­er ele­ments. This should not be the case because as men­tioned ear­li­er, a resume head­line is one of the first things a recruiter looks at. So make sure there are no mis­takes.

Washija is a versatile writer. She has a passion for content creation and is an avid reader.